Shermanstravel Blog

Tag Results: Melbourne

mushroom - flickr - furtwangl - 620Foraging is a culinary trend that isn’t going away, and it’s only getting bigger in travel. Many credit the movement to chef René Redzepi of Noma, the Michelin-starred restaurant in Copenhagen that frequently tops “Best in the World” restaurant lists. And it makes sense, especially at a time when travelers are seeking local and immersive experiences, the appeal of foraging for your own food is clear. It’s a fresh way to connect with a destination; it’s wonderfully tactile; and it’s a reminder of the wonders that nature has to offer.

These days, foraging in travel goes beyond reserving tables at a restaurant with an adventurous chef. More and more foraging tours and excursions have popped up in many locales. Here, we’ve rounded up some ideas and destinations to get you started. Just keep in mind that there are dangers in gathering your own food – including risk of illness if you eat the wrong thing – and the issue of sustainability in the harvesting process. That’s why we suggest that you always connect with a local expert or company that specializes in foraging; you’ll also want to know the local regulations and best practices. Read more

melbourne-Chris-Phutully-620Australia in general isn’t known for being cheap, and Melbourne specifically – touted as the world’s most livable city and the capital of the country’s most densely populated state – can be quite expensive. But it doesn’t always have to be, so long as you know the right places to go and how to get there. Here are five tips for enjoying the best of the city without spending a fortune: Read more

We all know that there’s something irresistible about a waddling penguin. But who knew that some species are facing extinction due to the changing climate and to commercial fishing practices? In honor of Penguin Awareness Day, we’ve rounded up three great spots that not only offer spectacular views of penguins, but also offer unique educational opportunities and do important preservation work.

Isla Martillo (Tierra del Fuego, Argentina)

Isla martillo penguins, ArgentinaFor the ultimate up-close-and-personal encounter, visit the Magellenic penguins of Argentina’s Isla Marillo; they’re extremely friendly. They make up the bulk of the 10,000 penguins who nest on the island from October through early April…

Read more

Red Star Line Museum, Antwerp, BelgiumBetween 1873 and 1935 the Red Star Line shipping company transported more than two million European migrants from Antwerp, Belgium to new lives in the “New World” of the United States and Canada. The shipping line’s former warehouses, which stood empty and decaying (and slated to be turned into apartments) since the line ceased operations, will reopen as a museum on September 28th.  Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners, the architectural firm behind the renovation and preservation of the Ellis Island Immigration Museum and Grand Central Terminal, were responsible for the warehouses’ restoration.

The museum will likely draw many American visitors who will be able to research their ancestry and see the very place, in a warehouse at the port of Antwerp, where their ancestors embarked on these life-changing journeys. Also of interest will be the stories of the famous passengers who left Europe on the Red Star Line, such as Irving Berlin, whose family loaned his transposing piano to the museum, and Albert Einstein who, as he fled Nazi persecution, wrote a letter on Red Star Line stationery announcing his resignation from the Prussian Academy of Sciences — also on loan to the museum.

The museum’s slogan is “People on the Move,” drawing attention to the fact that “migration is a universal phenomenon” and links the experience of the Red Star Line’s passengers with that of contemporary migrants. Interactive exhibits will attempt to simulate the experience of immigration, including a visit to, first, a Warsaw travel agency and finally an intake center in New York City or Philadelphia.

Here are some other migration museums around the world where you can trace your heritage…

Read more

Madame BrusselsEach year, The Economist releases its list of the world’s most livable cities – and for three years now, Melbourne in Australia has earned the number one spot. We got to thinking, there must be something we’re not seeing – certainly, we thought, it has nothing on Sydney’s rich culture, or the Gold Coast’s beautiful beaches, but after a little digging, we uncovered a few reasons why we think it’s made it to the top, year after year. Read more

Think of Melbourne as Sydney’s shy but sexy little sister, who doesn’t scream out for the spotlight, but once you get to know her, va va voom. I tacked on a couple of days in Melbourne at the tail end of my recent Australian travels, and regretted not having more time to idly explore the subtle charms of this captivating cosmopolitan capital, pulsing with creativity and cultural flair.

While lacking the major blockbuster attractions that typically reel in the international tourists, Melbourne’s real allure is uncovered while exploring its city-within-the-city, on its tucked-away “laneways” that sneak away from the wide, well-ordered, and trafficked streets of Melbourne’s polished facade. Here, a rich-in-character back-door world of bustling back alleyways brimming with quirky bars, trendsetting boutiques, cozy cafes, edgy art galleries, and multicultural restaurants is unveiled, all overseen by a vibrant and unrivaled street art scene. Read more

Train travel, whether for commuting or vacation, can be delightful. It’s slower than air travel, but it offers breathtaking scenery and a trip back in time to a more romantic era of adventure. Of course, traveling by train has its dangers. This video from Metro Trains Melbourne offers a not-so-subtle but incredibly cute reminder that you need to be aware of your surroundings and make good decisions when you’re away from home. They’ve built an equally adorable website to reinforce their message.

Be safe when riding the rails…and good luck getting this song out of your head. Sorry!

Elegant, old-world-style Cunard Line will offer their first-ever circumnavigation of Australia, primed for some unrivaled Down Under discovery, come February. Setting sail on February 14 (an over-the-top Valentine for your sweetie, perhaps?) from Sydney (also its point of return), the 22-night cruise aboard the 2,620-passenger Queen Mary 2 will provide cruisers a rare opportunity to completely navigate the massive country, as part of the vessel’s 2012 World Voyage. Read more

Flickr/Alan StantonAspiring art thieves, I’ve got good news for you – you can legally hone your thievery skills in Melbourne, Australia, at least until January 15. Melbourne’s Art Series Hotels (the Cullen, the Olsen, and the Blackman, each of which are designed around the work of iconic Australian artists) are about midway through a contest that encourages you to steal the art right off the walls. Well, some of the art, anyway. The hotels are (rather fittingly) currently offering up “Pulp Fiction” by renowned England-based graffiti artist Banksy, if you can steal it.

The artwork can only be stolen by a pre-paid guest of one of the hotels staying any time through January 15th, and only the Banksy piece is up for theft. The full terms and conditions can be found here, but notable rules include: “Be cool. Art thieves are always cool,” “Look the part- we prefer it if you are wearing black tie or a really stunning frock,” and “Banksy we really don’t want you to steal it. It would just be too twisted so please don’t.”

Read more

SHERMAN’S EXCLUSIVE

The Luxury
Melbourne is rolling out six Art Series Hotels through next year, each touting a name and design scheme inspired by a famous Australian artist. The group’s flagship property, The Olsen (named after landscape painter John Olsen), debuted in April on boutique-lined Chapel Street. Its 14 stories feature nearly 500 works from Olsen and 229 luminous guest rooms outfitted with sleek designer furnishings, art libraries, and full kitchenettes. An in-house art curator is available for tours. A duo of restaurants, a fitness center, and a day spa round out the offerings; its pool, among the world’s largest glass-bottom ones, cantilevers over bustling Chapel Street.

Read more

Sign up for the Top 25 Newsletter
to get exclusive weekly deals